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Frequently Asked Questions

Why choose Hardwood floors?
What is engineered hardwood flooring?
What is the difference between a laminate, solid hardwood and an engineered hardwood floor?
Besides different species, what else accounts for the different appearances in hardwoods?
What is the Janka hardness test and why should I be aware of it as a consumer?
How many times can you sand a floor?
Can I change the color of my hardwood floor when refinishing?
Do we have to move out of our home during the re- finishing process?
How long will the process take?
How should I care for my hardwood floor?
 

 

Why choose Hardwood floors?
 

Hardwood flooring is one of the most stunning additions you can integrate into your home. Hardwood floors add natural, long lasting beauty to any home. Additional benefits of hardwood flooring include:
- Installation of Hardwood Floors increases the value of your home instantly.
- Hardwood flooring costs less in the long run than other types of flooring.
- Properly maintained, hardwood floors can last a lifetime.
- Hardwood floors are more sanitary than other types of flooring.
- Hardwood floors are hypo-allergenic, trapping fewer allergens, bacteria and dust mites than other flooring options.
- Hardwood floors help to improve air quality.
- Hardwood floors are easy to maintain.
- There is a wide range of wood species, color, grain variation, and staining to choose from, to match your style.
- Hardwood floors can be repaired if damaged.
- It's always an option to have your floor refinished.

 

What is engineered hardwood flooring?

Engineered hardwood flooring is a product made up of a core of hardwood, plywood or HDF and a top layer of hardwood veneer that is glued on the top surface of the core and is available in almost any hardwood species. The product thus has the natural characteristics of the selected wood species as opposed to a photographic layer. The engineered product has been designed to provide greater stability, particularly where moisture or heat pose problems for solid hardwood floors.

 

What is the difference between a laminate, solid hardwood and an engineered hardwood floor?

Laminate core of product is typically made of High Density Fiber (HDF). The top layer is a photographic layer that should appear identical to the product it replicates, be it wood, vinyl, tile, etc. The product is generally 3/8" thick and is a floating install with tongue and groove glue less locking system which allows you to install and uninstall the floor several times if desired. This product is typically the least expensive. Solid Hardwood- the product is the solid natural wood species throughout the entire piece of flooring, typically with a tongue and groove installation. Has good sanding and refinishing capabilities. The product is typically more expensive and has some limitations as to where it can be installed due to moisture issues.

 

Besides different species, what else accounts for the different appearances in hardwoods?

Hardwood veneers have the same surface appearances as solid hardwood flooring because they're both natural hardwoods. Different appearances result from the different ways the hardwood are sawn.
The different sawing methods are:
i) Flat Sawn or Plain Sawn
ii) Rotary Cut
iii) Off-Set Rotary Cut
iv) Sliced Cut

Flat Sawn (also referred to as plain sawn) - can be flat grain (which has a cathedral or gothic effect) or vertical grain (which has a radial or edge grain effect).

Rotary Cut - method of cutting wood in which the hardwood layer is peeled off the log using large wood lathes. This peeling method shows dramatic, wilder graining.

Off-Set Rotary Cut - method of cutting wood which gives a sliced appearance and grain pattern with the added cross grain stability of sliced, without the sliced cost. Hardwoods are more dimensionally stable across the grain, and off-set rotary cutting takes advantage of this property. The yield is lower than a regular rotary cut creating a slight price increase vs. standard rotary.

Sliced Cut - method of cutting wood in which the hardwood layer is sawn like regular lumber. This shows method finer graining.

 

What is the Janka hardness test and why should I be aware of it as a consumer?

As a consumer of quality wood flooring, you naturally want to know how the product you are thinking about purchasing will withstand wearing and dents. The Janka hardness rating is your standard measurement for this purpose. The Janka test is conducted by measuring the force needed to lodge a .444-inch steel ball in the wood species to a depth of half the ball's diameter. The higher the rating, the harder is the species of wood. Of course, the Janka hardness rating is also useful when assessing how easy or difficult it is to hammer a nail into the hardwood or cut it with a saw.

 

How many times can you sand a floor?

As per the NOFMA calculations, the sanding operation should remove no more than 1/32". You should thus be able to sand a 1/16" hardwood layer on an engineered floor 1-2 times if correctly done. It is not recommended to sand a 1/32" thick hardwood layer.Solid wood floors can only be sanded to 1/32" above the tongue to maintain the stability of the tongue and groove joint.

 

Can I change the color of my hardwood floor when refinishing?

Yes at this time you have a wide range of stain Colours to choose from. You can also change the finish to satin, semi gloss or gloss.

 

Do we have to move out of our home during the re- fishing process?

We use a waterbed finish coat that very low in voc's and will not harm your family or pets, We can also work around your family's schedule to accomodate

 

How long will the process take?

In most cases it takes between 3 to 4 days depending on the square footage and whether or not you request a stain.

 

How should I care for my hardwood floor?

Floor Care Tips - Vacuum or sweep your floor regularly to prevent scratching.
We recommend general cleaning once a week.
Clean up spills promptly using a clean cloth.
Use floor mats at exterior doors to catch most dirt and grit. Use area rugs in high-traffic areas, at the ends of steps, and near doorways
.Avoid rubber backing or non-ventilated rugs. Use protective pads or caps under furniture. Examine your floor's finish so wear is caught early, before complete refinishing is necessary. Maintain a consistent humidity level year-round in all areas with hardwood flooring. Excessive variations in humidity levels can cause hardwood to swell, shrink, cup, crack, and show gaps between boards. We recommend the use of humidifiers or dehumidifiers in areas where humidity is inconsistent

 

 

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HERITAGE FLOORING - HEAD OFFICE:
30 Carrier Drive, Suite 201 Toronto, Ontario M9W 5T7
Phone: 416.674.6679
Fax: 416.674.8567
Email: info@heritagehardwood-flooring.com

Copyright © Heritage Hardwood Flooring, 2016

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